Maurice Harris | USA

Stockton, California, USA, 1981

Maurice Harris is a star, in every positive sense of the word. Not just because of his client list, which includes some of the biggest names in Hollywood and leading brands like Louis Vuitton, Opening Ceremony, Dior, Nike, Gucci, The Row, Valentino and Dolce & Gabbana. And not because his work has been featured in Vogue, W Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, Hollywood Reporter, The New York Times and AD, or because his talents aren’t limited to floral art: you can see his photographs on display at the San Diego Art Institute or attend one of his performances at The Broad. Harris has the charisma and strength that characterises a star, and he manages to convey those qualities in each of his creations, which tend to be a riot of colour and excess.

The form and substance of his works are steeped in his sense of humour, craftsmanship and commitment to the African American, LGBTIQ+ and other frequently marginalised communities. Harris combines beauty and social awareness at his studio in the heart of Echo Park, one of L.A.’s most vibrant neighbourhoods, and in his television appearances: viewers may have recently seen him on his American TV show “Centerpiece” or the HBOMax reality show “Full Bloom”.

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TABLEAU | DENMARK

TABLEAU is not merely the most contemporary floristry proposal to be seen at FLORA this year: this cross-disciplinary studio based in the heart of Copenhagen is also an art gallery, design studio and concept store. Established just over 3 years ago by the experienced florist Julius Værnes Iversen –who immediately brought the architectural and graphic skills of Katrine Morel on board to complete the team–, TABLEAU was created with the aim of breaking down the limited notions of classic floral design to raise it to the category of art. Iversen has no doubt: those who share his vision must be considered artists rather than floral designers or florists.
Every TABLEAU floral installation tells a story, hence the name of the studio itself – tableau – a word of Latin origin that means scenario or small scene and is clearly used in the sense of creating places that foster stories. These scenarios are minimalist in nature, featuring clean lines and the use of contrasts, as well as a taste for the monochromatic. TABLEAU’s style is obvious from the moment one enters their venue in Store Kongensgade Street, revealed in the grey concrete walls, cold LED lighting, striking blue vinyl floor and the pleasant combination of plants, flowers, design objects and art.
In addition to Julius Værnes Iversen and Katrine Morel, the core team at TABLEAU also includes Jonas Pejstrup and Marie Arnt, as floral designers, and Josephine Jein in Communication.

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Terabitia | SPAIN

Madrid, 1974. Terabitia is the professional undertaking of a lifetime for Carolina Estévez. After working for more than twenty years in the transportation and logistics sector, Estévez decided to combine her years of education in humanities (social science, literature and languages) and in floral art (at institutions such as the Escuela Española de Arte Floral, Savia Bruta, New Skills Academy in the US and Kays Flowers School in Ireland) to create Terabitia Arte Floral.

Following the motto of using the language of flowers as a means of artistic expression, Terabitia stands out for its work in the design and set-up of decorative floral arrangements for events and backdrops in film, TV and advertising, with customers such as Amazon Prime Video, Netflix and Mediapro.

Terabitia is defined as an editorial florist: “We tell stories with our pieces of floral art, which are designed around that fascinating ‘click’ that happens when an idea pops up”, remarks Estévez. That ‘click’ is also what has led her to win our FLORA Festival Patio Talento 2021 call for proposals, which aims to discover the newest talents in floral art.

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Cordero Atelier | SPAIN

Madrid, Spain, 1980

Sara Uriarte is, for several reasons, a rare bird in the world of floral art, as is FLORA. The driving force behind her creative studio—Cordero Atelier, specialised in art direction with a unique and impetuous vision of floral art—is Sara’s passion for flowers, which was born in a laboratory rather than a garden. A trained pharmacist, she soon learned that every identifying feature of a species serves a perfect and specific purpose in a given environment. After years spent analysing plants, she began working with them to express herself and to inspire emotion, convey ideas or connect with other people. Today Uriarte is one of the most interesting floral artists in Spain, constantly sought after by Hermès, Loewe, Narciso Rodríguez, Kenzo and other brands.

Cordero Atelier projects have a strong architectural and sculptural tendency. The analysis of surprising shapes and structures is a constant in these works: botany plays at creating an ecosystem where every element does its part, despite the appearance of chaos. For Cordero Atelier, unlike the vast majority of florists, is more concerned with the “mass” than with the silhouette of each individual stem and bloom. Sara Uriarte has explained that she sees floral art as “a mass of energy, imbued with both force and meaning, that bursts onto the scene with its own authority, that fascinates, disconcerts and even invades, reclaiming the space stolen from nature”. Undoubtedly a different approach to the botanical realm.

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Yuji Kobayashi | JAPAN

Tokyo, Japan, 1963

One of the inevitable hallmarks of every great artist is forging a personal style, and Yuji Kobayashi, with his radical approach to flowers and plants, found his long ago. Few floral creators are as recognisable as this Japanese artist, with the “Geometric Green” that is his obsession and also the name of his studio. 

Kobayashi imagines forms that are impossible in nature and makes them a reality thanks to his surprising, meticulous design and architecture work.  Rather than blending in with the surrounding space, his creations play with it by means of contrast and the particular dialogue between straight and curved lines, symmetry and chance. He admittedly finds architecture more inspiring than traditional floral design, as one can tell by looking at any of his arrangements.

Yuji Kobayashi has spent twenty-nine years looking for ways to improve and embellish floral designs. After a brief musical career, he decided to learn the art of flower arrangement on his own, which is particularly remarkable for someone who has been an honoured guest at institutions like Cohim in Beijing, one of the most respected flower schools in the world. Additionally, he is responsible for the floral decorations at the finest Japanese hotels (Park Hyatt Tokyo, Hyatt Regency Hakone, Hyatt Regency Seragaki Okinawa) and has worked for Chanel, Dior, Giorgio Armani, Louis Vuitton, Baccarat, Wedgwood and many other top brands.

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Una idea original de Zizai Cultura

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